FatWallet – Culture Crush #2

Seal of awesome A few months ago, I publicly announced my culture crush on Kahler Slater when I highlighted just one of the awesome initiatives they have for their employees in this blog post here on Fistful of Talent. While they’ll always be one of my favorite companies to ooh and ahh over, I find myself crushing on new companies all the time. I figured Fistful of Talent would be a great place for me to share some of the awesome things other companies are doing that set themselves apart. So here goes…

FatWallet and their Walleteers

What you may not know about me is that in addition to being a fanatic about culture and engagement, I’m one of the most frugal people around. I LOVE finding good deals and was pleasantly surprised when I found out that the bargain hunting website FatWallet not only offered me really sweet deals but has an amazing culture as well.

I had the pleasure of touching base with the founder, Tim Storm (aka Chief Mucky Muck), and the Director of Operations, April Kunzelman, just days after they were recognized as the 20th Best Small Company to Work For in America. During our conversation, their philosophies about onboarding, Core Values, and ‘work not sucking’ were dead on, but one policy specifically jumped out at me – their “No-Miss” policy.

The “No-Miss” Policy

At FatWallet, there’s a lot of emphasis around finding balance, and this policy reinforces that. It’s simple; ‘Never use work as an excuse to miss it. If it’s important to you, we’ll figure out a way to make it happen.’

I’m not sure about all of you, but there have definitely been times in my career where I’ve chosen work over really important personal obligations. Or I’ve chosen those personal obligations over work but spent the entire time worrying about work. Having a policy like this, that’s actually built into the core of the company and embraced by everyone from the top down would have been awesome.

But there’s more. This policy might be easy to implement if you’re a software development shop where schedules don’t really matter and it’s easy to have people work flex-schedules, but FatWallet isn’t like that. They’re a 24/7 customer service company, and in order to make sure customers are happy, they have to have Walleteers on the phones at all times. This means that when one employee is making use of the “No-Miss” policy, others have to take on their burden. Yet they do so graciously.

The reason why is no surprise to me. It’s because the culture at FatWallet is one where everyone steps in to help, where what goes around comes around, and where employees “treat others as they’d want to be treated” (one of Tim’s philosophies). It’s because the leaders believe in these things whole heartedly, and it’s because people like Tim (Chief Mucky Muck & Founder) can be found taking customer service calls on Christmas so his employees can spend time at home with their kids (true story).

As many of you know, I’m an anti-policy kind of person, but this policy (and FatWallet as a whole) gets two thumbs up.

Work-life balance isn’t a new idea, so I’m sure there are tons of companies out there with cool policies like this one. What’s your best example?

FOT Background Check

Marisa Keegan
Marisa is a Culture Coach for small and quickly growing organizations trying to establish the infrastructure required to create a company full of passionate, motivated, and engaged employees. She has held culture and engagement roles for two nationally recognized great places to work, founded the research and networking group Culture Fanatics, and is an industry recognized blogger. She lives in Richmond, Virginia with her husband and twin boys and is looking forward to the day she can bike across the country to raise money for MS research. @marisakeegan.

2 Comments

  1. fran melmed says:

    it’s not my “best” example, but being a gal who loves to celebrate her birthday (for a month), i love my friends’ company’s policy of no-work birthdays. everybody in their company automatically gets their birthday as a paid day off.
    f

    Reply
  2. Andy says:

    More Companies should adopt policies like these, especially the paid no work birthday. There definitely needs to be a shift in attitudes in the workplace that focuses on people instead of the bottom line.

    Reply

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