Next Practices

what's next

Don’t try stealing Next Practices as your new book title—someone already got it on Amazon.  I’m sick of “best practices;” I’m ready for “next practices.” What are next practices?

Next practices are those things that people are doing that are truly innovative.  Take a look at Zappos (a little part of me dies each time I have to say that, and it’s not because I don’t love them—they’re wonderful people—but we use them too often as an example) and their announcement of killing job postings. Or maybe it’s things like video interviewing and screening—over 80% of companies are still not using this technology.  What about products like Blackbook HR’s Sense? Addressing the idea of turnover before it even becomes an idea in your employees mind! What about paying people to interview with your company? Truly doing something different than your competition.

Most HR shops are still fighting fires. Don’t get depressed over that if you’re in that mode as we speak… almost all HR shops are there. That’s why you seek “best practices.” It’s already proven… someone else has already done all the heavy lifting, it’s more than likely an easy win for you and your team.  But don’t confuse best practices for innovation—it’s not the same thing.

Give me a minute to explain because I was once just where you are today—believing best practices were the be all, end all of making HR better great.

Here’s the issue: Best practices don’t make HR better, best practices make HR the same. Innovation, creativity and thought leadership make HR better.  So, if all you’re doing is picking up HR best practices from your competition, from other industries, from your peers—you aren’t pushing HR forward, you’re actually just pushing HR to the middle.

Let me give you a personal example. I was once leading a HR Generalist function for a division of a large multi-national company.  This company, for its time, was a leading HR shop—industry awards, great metrics, the whole nine yards.  Each quarter they would have all the generalists come together to share “best practices,” with the thought that sharing best practices amongst the divisions will make us stronger as a whole. Sounds good so far, right?  So, we all come in with our flashy PowerPoints and prepare to wow our peers with our best practices on everything from employee relations tracking tools to succession planning training modules for hiring managers—the majority of which were copied from our last organization that we were at, but with a cut and paste of our current company logo—and the new verbiage that changed “employee” to “associate” because we’re now cool and hip and care about our “associates.”

Were these best practices? Yes. Were these making parts of the organization better? Yes. Were these going to lead our organization out of average?  Well, maybe slightly above average, but only for a short time, until our competition truly came up with something innovative. Then we would be back to trying to get back to average.

The problem with instituting best practices is they don’t make you a “leading organization,” they make you a “following” organization.  To lead means to innovate, and the only way you get to lead is to let those who work with you fail.

What? Fail! Yes, fail.

Best practices don’t come through failure, they come through “good enough” or “better than we had before”—BUT true innovation, true industry leading ideas come through failure. Having something so broken, you start over and build something for your organization that gives you a competitive advantage—something that others will emulate and call “Best Practice.”

It’s okay.  We all did it. We all went after the best practices—doesn’t make you bad, but it will make you average.

FOT Background Check

Tim Sackett
Tim Sackett SPHR, is the ultimate Mama’s Boy!  After 15+ years of successfully leading HR and Talent Acquisition departments for Fortune 500s and smaller technical firms, Tim took over running the contingent staffing firm HRU Technical Resources in Lansing, MI. Serving as the Executive Vice President, Tim runs the company his mother started over 30 years ago, and don’t tell Mom, but he thinks he does a better job at it than she did!  Check out his blog at www.timsackett.com. Because he's got A LOT to say, and FOT just isn't enough for him.

One Comment

  1. Disgruntled Mime says:

    Closers gonna close; get that man a coffee! #CoffeeIsForClosers

    Reply

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