Screw The Gym. 3 Healthier Ways To Keep Your 2016 HR Resolutions


January 1st.  My gym is packed.  Brand new workout gear is on display.  There’s a line for the adduction lever machine.

Fitness resolutions are certainly worthy, but, like most well-intentioned resolutions, are hard to keep without help.  You’ve also probably got some HR resolutions on your list.  Why not kill two birds… and forget the gym!  Here are three ways to keep your 2016 fitness AND HR resolutions on track.

Pickup Basketball:  I grew up playing pickup basketball at my local Y.  I never knew who was going to be there, how long we’d play or even if I could compete.  Pickup basketball taught me how to be tough, agile and how to read people.  I also played on an organized team which had its own merits, but in a pickup game I had to quickly assess the unknown.  Where was I going to be best utilized?  Who was the shooter?  Who was slower than me?

In HR, we are constantly in a pickup game, so having the ability to assess and adapt—and do it quickly—are crucial skills.  In 2016, we will be faced with more dynamic teams comprised of part-timers, short-term consultants and interim workers.  We have to be prepared with the right tools, org structure, compensation plans and communication strategies to manage such a workforce.  This requires agility to the max!

Yoga (or as I call it, Intense Stretching):  Honestly, I can’t do either.  However, I recognize the importance of flexibility and strength for health and HR.  I have sciatica that flares up whenever I do stupid things—like run farther than I should.  A couple of key stretches and doing them consistently to improve my flexibility helps tremendously.  I hear yoga would help me, too.

2016 will bring even greater flexibility demands from today’s workers.  The Families and Work Institute reported that 88 percent of employees said having flexibility is “extremely” or “very” important in considering a job offer.  HR will have to do more to integrate this thinking as part of their organization’s business strategy.  You can’t have an effective policy if you don’t have the culture to support and model it.

Walking/Running Groups:  I’ve always tended to run alone but there is a motivational and social aspect to running groups I enjoy.  The “we’re in it together” attitude along with finding out the latest hot restaurant serves multiple purposes.  There also tends to be a competitive vibe…. as in “No way Courtney is going to beat my pace this week!”

Social and motivational needs in HR?  Look no further than your recruiting team.  Social-centric recruiting strategies should be the norm in 2016.  Social networks mean talent is findable and, most often, wanting to connect.

Danielle Monaghan, head of talent acquisition-consumer at Amazon, sees recruiting teaming up with marketing to focus on having more meaningful interactions with potential candidates.  When it comes to a social recruiting strategy, she believes, “If your company is not willing to engage with what job seekers of the future want, prepare to be left behind.”

Grab your basketball, yoga mat and lace up your running shoes!  2016 promises to continue the evolution of the HR function and you need to be physically and professionally prepared to keep up!

FOT Background Check

Kathy Rapp
Kathy Rapp is the President of hrQ, where she helps companies find groovy HR Talent or HR Consultants to drive business results.  Prior to joining hrQ, Kathy booked more than 15 years of human resources leadership experience working for such companies as Morgan Stanley and First Data Corporation.  A connoisseur of the intersection between pop culture and business, Kathy believes many talent issues can be addressed via the succession planning lessons experienced by Van Halen  (David Lee/Sammy and sadly, Gary Cherone).

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