Steve Boese talks The Wisdom of Jeff Van Gundy Part VII – On Visible Failure

Steve Boese Steve Boese, Worldwide FOT

Over the weekend as I was doing blog writing/research, i.e., watching NBA basketball, I caught the better part of a game between the Chicago Bulls and the Los Angeles Clippers. At a few points in the game the Bulls invoked a strategy of intentional fouling commonly known as ‘Hack-a-Shaq’, named after NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal, a notoriously poor free throw shooter. The idea of the ‘Hack-a-Shaq’ gambit is that since the player targeted to be intentionally fouled is such a poor free throw shooter that he would likely miss both free throws most of the time, thus resulting in an ’empty’ or non-scoring possession for his team. Stack a few of these empty possessions in a row, and the fouling team could conceivably stake a large lead, or close a large deficit.

In the Bulls v. Clippers game, (ably announced by Mike Breen and former NBA coach and the star of this semi-regular ‘Wisdom’ series on the blog, Jeff Van Gundy), the Bulls’ target for executing the ‘Hack-a-Shaq’ strategy was the Clipper center DeAndre Jordan, who like Shaq himself, is a terrible free throw shooter, making only about 40% of his attempts from the line. To set some context, the league average is about 75% accuracy, with the best free throw shooters making about 90% of their attempts.

Read the whole post over at Steve Boese’s HR Technology Journal (an FOT contributor blog).