Get KD’s New Book: THE 9 FACES OF HR

Kris Dunn Career Advice, Career Paths, Change, Change Management, Coaching, Generations, Good HR, HR 2 Comments

It’s true. I just launched a book and it is doing well. It’s called THE 9 FACES OF HR. If you like reading The HR Capitalist or Fistful of Talent, you’re going to like the book and you should check it out. Here’s the summary from Amazon for your consideration: “Popular blogger and CHRO Kris Dunn presents a hard, but compelling reality: every HR professional on …

Lessons On Leadership from My Bad Boss(es)

Katrina Kibben Corporate America, employee experience, Leadership, Talent Management, Uncategorized 0 Comments

Need a conversation prompt? Just say, “I hate my boss.” Add a swear for emphasis, some name-calling if that makes you feel better. That phrase usually starts an echo around a table or at a bar. A lot of “me too” and “oh, you should meet mine.” Then everyone starts to recite all of the oh-so-obvious ways that their managers …

Management Fads Come and Go, But Here’s an Oldie You Should Get on Board With

John Hollon Change Management, Coaching, Culture, Driving Productivity, Employee Development, Employee Engagement, John Hollon, Leadership, Managing People, Uncategorized 1 Comment

Management fads come and go, but one thing never changes — the fact that that most management fads don’t seem to last. That’s why I was surprised when I saw this recent Wall Street Journal article touting “agile management” as the hot, new management trend. My doubt was fueled by the third paragraph of the Journal story that openly admitted …

10 Things HR Should Have Given Up by Now

Kathy Rapp Audacious Ideas, Change, Change Management, Coaching, Communication, Contingent Workforce, Corporate America, Culture, Driving Productivity, Employee Engagement, Engagement and Satisfaction, Good HR, Harassment, HR, Uncategorized 3 Comments

I attended an awards luncheon where the nominees were asked the question, “What would you have expected to have given up by now?” Answers involved a lot of childhood sweets, biting nails and imaginary dogs (that was not mine). Slap that question on the HR profession and I have a few ideas around the answers. Some are common sense and …

Welcome to the Sh*t Show!

Tim Sackett Change, Change Management, Communication, Corporate America, Culture, Employee Communications, Uncategorized 0 Comments

Have you ever noticed that as soon as you believe your organizational dysfunction has reached a peak, you always can find another organization that takes it one step further? We love to think that our “Sh*t Show” is the worst, but we always know it’s not. Recently, I was speaking with some colleagues about some stuff going on and I …

LINKEDIN RANT: The Folly of Accepting 90% of the Connection Requests I Get

Kris Dunn Communication, Job Boards, Job Market, job postings, Passive Candidates, Recruiting, Talent Acquisition 2 Comments

It’s fair to say LinkedIn has changed everyone’s life in recruiting. But not always for the better. LinkedIn is the golden child of candidate databases, now claiming to have 575 million unique profiles (260 monthly actives) residing within its servers.  It’s the database of choice for recruiters, and while the service represents the biggest database of active and passive candidates …

Always in Beta

Mark Fogel Change, Change Management, HR (& Life!) Advice, Innovation, Mark Fogel 0 Comments

One of my clients refers to itself as “always under construction”…that’s another way of saying you’re always in Beta… This has been their tagline for close to twenty years and they truly are always under construction in every way they approach business including HR and Talent… But what is Beta? Webster’s defines it as: a stage of development in which …

Was Gladwell Wrong About Outliers? The Latest on Practice and the 10,000 Hour Rule

Kris Dunn Audacious Ideas, Coaching, Learning and Development, Talent Management 1 Comment

If you’re a high-end, progressive HR, recruiting or talent pro, you know about the 10,000 hour rule, a research area made popular by the Malcolm Gladwell book Outliers. The seed for the 10,000-hour rule was a 1993 study of violinists and pianists which found that accumulated practice time rose with musical prowess. On average, top-ranked violinists had clocked up 10,000 hours of …

Should We Retire the Term “Full-Time” Position?

Paul Hebert Employee Development, Employee Engagement, HR, Uncategorized 4 Comments

As I survey the employee/employer relationship landscape, I really never see a great story. Oh, sure, there are good “anecdotes” here and there of some company (typically privately held, startup-mentality, uber-cool) doing something unique and interesting enough to get into INC and Forbes. These stories are the bloody chum consultants tweet, retweet, post and build models around (until the next …

Paid Family Leave is a No-Brainer

Kylie Quetell Benefits, Compensation/Cash Money, Corporate Social Responsiblity, Employee Engagement, employee experience, Employee Relations, Uncategorized 0 Comments

As you begin reading this article, imagine a place where babies are born into the world by mothers and fathers that might want to spend a little bit of time with the newborn.  Just a few weeks though, nothing wild.  Crazy, right?  You would think so when you look at federal policy that protects the rights of working parents, and also …